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This May, I was featured in GQ Magazine about my life and Bitcoin

You can read the full article here: http://www.gq.com/life/tech/201406/bitcoin

Some excerpts:

I liked Charlie Shrem from the moment we met, with his winning smile and the improbable five-o’clock-next-Tuesday shadow on his chin. There was a nervous, distracted charisma about him. He rarely laughed, but just beneath that serious veneer, he was affable and smart. And distinct from the thousands of words I’d read and heard about Bitcoin, Charlie didn’t drag me through computer code or diagram the cryptographic innovations of the new currency. He didn’t go all A Beautiful Mind on me, because I assured him that I was never gonna comprehend the technical depths of Bitcoin. So, for my benefit, he used big, primary-color analogies, and for the first time, I understood the larger role this new money could have, the niche in the financial market that it had been created to fill. “Bitcoin is two things!” Charlie explained, abruptly raising his voice. “There’s lowercase bitcoin and uppercase Bitcoin. It’s both the currency you send and the means by which you send it. While banks, PayPal, and Western Union are all the things that help move money around the world—the finance system—Bitcoin is both blood and vein. It’s not only the payment system of transfer: It’s also the unit of value being transferred across the system.” He emitted information just like that: in sudden, discrete transmissions, as if signaling from a ship at sea. The entire concept of Bitcoin—the platform upon which Charlie made his millions—had been the brainchild of a programmer (or for all we know, a small group of programmers) using the name Satoshi Nakamoto, who first described the Bitcoin concept on a cryptography mailing list in 2008. It wasn’t fleshed out, but the basics had shimmer. Bitcoin would be a peer-to-peer network, Satoshi wrote, in which payments didn’t have to flow through third-party financial institutions. It was based not on trust but on data, such as time stamps, the kind of hard numbers that even the most anarchic libertarian could bank on.

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